Long Compton, St Peter and St Paul

St Peter and St Paul, Long Compton is the largest of the seven churches in the South Warwickshire Benefice. Come and worship with us - whether you are a local resident, a weekend visitor or holidaymaker, you will receive a warm welcome here.

Services are held here on three Sundays every month (see here). The usual pattern is:

  1st Sunday in the month, 9am Holy Communion, Book of Common Prayer and 4pm Informal Service, with Sunday school for children
   
  2nd Sunday 10.30am Morning Prayer (no communion), Common Worship
   
  3rd Sunday  4pm Informal Service, with Sunday school for children


On the fourth Sunday, the churches of the Benefice join together for a 10.30 service of Holy Communion, Common Worship, followed by refreshments. These services rotate around all the churches of the Benefice, see our Sunday Worship page for details.

We have a strong relationship with Long Compton's primary school, Acorns. Pupils visit the church  several times in the year including a Harvest and Christmas service. On alternate weeks the Rector and  other church members take part in assemblies at the school.

The Friends of Long Compton church, formed in 2011, holds events in the church three or four times every year, ranging from classical concerts to jazz and swing, as well as lectures and talks. These events draw in large audiences from the local community and provide a significant source of funding for repairs and upkeep of the church building and its surroundings. For details of upcoming events contact Sue Klatt on 01608 684813 email SueKlatt@lineone.net

About this church

St Peter and St Paul is a local landmark, standing at the centre of this Cotswold village, often photographed by passing tourists. Dating from the 13th century, the church is a light and welcoming place. It is open to visitors every day in daylight hours, to admire the architecture and dwell on its history, or to spend some quiet time in prayer or reflection

The exterior is well known for its lych-gate, which passes under an old thatched cottage. The path up to the church door is flanked by yew balls and a grassy, stone walled churchyard. Inside, Long Compton church is a well-tended mix of ancient and modern. It was extensively restored in Victorian times, but its mediaeval character remains in its handsome proportions and attractive stonework. The whitewashed walls and clear glass in most of the windows give the church a light and airy feel.

The west of the church was altered in 2004 to provide two glass-fronted meeting rooms and a balcony, as well as kitchen facilities. This means that the church can be used more flexibly: for children's groups during some services, for meetings and break-out groups, and as a venue for concerts and other community events.